Our Priority

The Shared Future Coalition focuses on preventing alcohol use among adolescents. The human brain does not fully mature until the mid-twenties.1 Using alcohol before the brain is fully developed can interfere with the final stages of brain development.2  When children and teens begin using alcohol before the age of 15, research shows that they are four times more likely to become chemically dependent in the future.3 Due to limited resources, the Shared Future Coalition prioritizes alcohol misuse prevention among 12-25 year olds in order to foster healthy brain development that can have positive impacts on health and wellbeing far into the future.

Our Position

Young people under the age of 25 and other vulnerable populations are particularly susceptible to the effects of excessive alcohol use.4,5 Excessive alcohol use includes any use under the age of 21, heavy drinking, and binge drinking.6 Young adults ages 21 to 25 who use alcohol can use the low-risk drinking guide below to reduce the negative impacts associated with alcohol use:

 

Low-Risk Drinking Guide7

0 Zero drinks for those who are under the age of 21; are driving, cycling, etc.; have medical issues
1 One drink per hour is about what our bodies can process
2 Limiting drinking to two times per week results in less negative consequences for young adults aged 21 to 25
3 Sticking to three drinks on a special occasion can decrease the likelihood of alcohol-related problems

Supporting Data

  • In 2019, 26.9% of Deschutes County 11th graders (16-17 year olds) reported having at least one drink of alcohol in the past 30 days, as compared to 24.3% statewide.8 (not shown)
  • Since 2010, the percentage of Deschutes County 11th graders (16-17 year olds) who report using any alcohol in the past 30 days as been consistently higher than the state average.9 (Figure 1)
  • Since 2010, the percentage of Deschutes County 11th graders (16-17 year olds) reporting binge drinking in the past 30 days has been higher than the state average.10 (Figure 2)
  • In 2017-18, the estimated percentage of Oregonians, ages 12 and older, who met the criteria for substance use disorder in the past year was higher than the national average.11 (Figure 3)
  • Oregon has experienced a 34% increase in the overall rate of alcohol-related deaths between 2001 and 2017.12 (Figure 4)

 

  • Since 2012, the percentage of 11th graders (16-17 year olds) in Deschutes County who report any alcohol use or binge drinking has steadily decreased.13 (Figure 5)
  • 67% of young adults 18 to 34 years old in Deschutes County did NOT binge drink in the past 30 days.14 (Figure 6)
  • 71% of females and 63% of males in Deschutes County aged 18 to 34 years do NOT binge drink.15 (Figure 7)

Our Solutions

Our high level goal is to reduce underage and binge drinking for people up to age 25

The Shared Future Coalition recognizes that the negative impacts of alcohol use are not the same for all people in Deschutes County. The Shared Future Coalition strives to meet the needs of those who are at greatest risk of misusing alcohol, as well as the needs of people who are experiencing higher levels of negative impact from alcohol misuse. Young people under the age of 25 and other vulnerable populations are particularly susceptible to the effects of excessive alcohol use, as noted in our position statement.

Example Projects

“UpShift” program in Bend-La Pine Schools

  • All students who violate school district alcohol use policies have access to individualized services designed to stop alcohol or other drug use
  • Services offered have been shown to be effective in research studies

Connect Workshop for Parents

  • FREE, two-hour workshop for parents and guardians in Deschutes County to learn factual, unbiased information and skills to start conversations with their kids about alcohol and other drug use

Assessment of community events in Bend (2019-2020)

  • Assess availability and promotion of alcohol, community norms, and possible consequences associated with alcohol use among minors and young adults ages 21 to 25
  • Qualitative data collection: event observations, key informant interviews, focus groups, digital media scans
  • Quantitative data collection: law enforcement and emergency room data

Public Awareness campaigns (2013-2015):

  • Presented the low-risk drinking guide
  • Defined binge drinking, shared data that most young people don’t binge drink
  • Reminded people aged 21 and over not to provide alcohol to minors
  • Engaged young adults in a video contest promoting healthy choices related to alcohol use

Infographics

Cause for Concern Figures

Cause for Hope Figures

References

[1] Fostering Healthy Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Development in Children and Youth: A National Agenda. (2019). The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/25201[2] Hiller-Sturmhofel, S., & Swartzwelder, H. S. (n.d.). NIAAA Publications. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Publications. Retrieved November 8, 2021, from https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh284/213-221.htm[3] Grant, B. F., & Dawson, D. A. (1997). Age at onset of alcohol use and its association with DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence: results from the national longitudinal alcohol epidemiologic survey. Journal of Substance Abuse, 9, 103–110. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0899-3289(97)90009-2[4] 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Detailed Tables. (2015). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015.pdf[5] 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Detailed Tables. (2015). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015/NSDUH-DetTabs-2015.pdf[6] National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. (n.d.). Excessive Alcohol Use. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved November 10, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/
resources/publications/factsheets/alcohol.htm
[7] Alcohol Use and Your Health | CDC. (n.d.). Centers of Disease Control and Prevention – Alcohol and Public Health. Retrieved November 8, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/alcohol-use.htm[8] Oregon Health Authority. (2019). 2019 Results : Oregon Healthy Teens Survey. Oregon Health Authority : Oregon Healthy Teens Survey. Retrieved November 3, 2021, from https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/BIRTHDEATHCERTIFICATES/SURVEYS/OREGONHEALTHYTEENS/Pages/2019.aspx[9] Oregon Health Authority. (2010-2018). Student Wellness Survey. Health Surveys : Oregon Health Authority. Retrieved November 3, 2021, from https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/BIRTHDEATHCERTIFICATES/SURVEYS/Pages/Student-Wellness-Survey.aspx[10] Oregon Health Authority. (2010-2018). Student Wellness Survey. Health Surveys : Oregon Health Authority. Retrieved November 3, 2021, from https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/BIRTHDEATHCERTIFICATES/SURVEYS/Pages/Student-Wellness-Survey.aspx[11] SAMHSA. (2019, December). 2017-2018 National Survey On Drug Use And Health: Model-Based Prevalence Estimates (50 States And The District Of Columbia). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. https://www.samhsa.gov/data/report/2017-2018-nsduh-state-prevalence-estimates[12] Oregon Health Authority : Oregon Death Data : Death Data : State of Oregon. (n.d.). Oregon Death Data : Oregon Health Authority. Retrieved September 15, 2021, from https://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/birthdeathcertificates/vitalstatistics/death/pages/index.aspx[13] Oregon Health Authority. (2010-2018). Student Wellness Survey. Health Surveys : Oregon Health Authority. Retrieved September 15, 2021, from https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/BIRTHDEATHCERTIFICATES/SURVEYS/Pages/Student-Wellness-Survey.aspx[14] Oregon Health Authority : BRFSS Data : Results by County : State of Oregon. (2010-2013, 2014-2017). BRFSS Data : Oregon Health Authority. Retrieved September 20, 2021, from https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/BIRTHDEATH
CERTIFICATES/SURVEYS/ADULTBEHAVIORRISK/COUNTY/Pages/index.aspx
[15] Oregon Health Authority : BRFSS Data : Results by County : State of Oregon. (2010-2013, 2014-2017). BRFSS Data : Oregon Health Authority. Retrieved September 20, 2021, from https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/BIRTHDEATH
CERTIFICATES/SURVEYS/ADULTBEHAVIORRISK/COUNTY/Pages/index.aspx

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list to receive the Shared Future Coalition eNewsletter.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Share This